Do You Need a Special License to Drive an RV

Last Updated on September 26, 2021 by Jessica

If you’re ready to buy a new RV, you may be asking, “Do you need a special license to drive an RV?”

Some of the biggest RVs look like people should get special training before they’re able to put them on the road, but that’s not always the case. In fact, it depends on the state whether people need a special license to drive an RV or not.

Special License Laws

Before buying your RV and trying to drive an RV without a special license, you need to check with your local DMV. A normal license to drive might be enough, or you may have to get a commercial driver’s license.

It might not make sense to get a commercial driver’s license because you’re only using it for recreation, but some states don’t care about that. It’s all about the weight and measurements of the RV.

Most of the time, if your RV is under 26,000 pounds, then you’re good to go, and you can stop working about RV license requirements because your non-commercial license is all you need.

List of State RV Driver License Requirements

Here is a guide to the driver’s license requirements for RV drivers.

States Requiring a Commercial Driver’s License

Arkansas: If what you’re towing plus your vehicle is over 26,000 pounds, you’ll need a CDL.

Connecticut: Depending on your setup and combination of 26,000 pounds or more, you’ll need a CDL A or CDL B.

Hawaii: You have to have a class B license if you have a single vehicle over 26,000 pounds, but if it is two vehicles over 26,000 pounds combined, you’ll need a class A license.

Kansas: You have to have a class B license if you have a single vehicle exceeding 26,000 pounds. Two vehicles over 26,000 pounds combined means you’ll need a class A license.

New Mexico: Single vehicles over 26,000 pounds require a class B license. Multiple vehicles over 26,000 pounds require a class A license.

Washington, D.C.: If your vehicle is over 26,000 pounds, you have to have a class B license. If you have multiple vehicles at a combined weight of over 26,000 pounds, you need a class A license.

Wisconsin: If your vehicle is over 45 feet, you have to have a CDL.

States with Other Driver’s License Requirements

California: You have to have a class B license for vehicles over 26,000 feet or over 40 feet. If you are towing something over 10,000 pounds, you need to have a class A license.

Maryland: If your vehicle is over 26,000 pounds, you need a class B license.

Michigan: If you are towing a fifth-wheel plus a trailer, you’ll need a double R endorsement.

North Carolina: If you’re towing a single vehicle over 26,000 pounds, you need a class B license. If you’re towing multiple vehicles with a combined weight of over 26,000 pounds, then you need a class A license.

Nevada: If you have a vehicle over 26,000, you need a class B license. If you have multiple vehicles with a combined weight of over 26,000, you need a class A license. For vehicles under 26,000 pounds but over 10,000 pounds, you need a J endorsement.

New York: For RVs over 26,000 pounds, you need an R endorsement.

Pennsylvania: If you have a single vehicle over 26,000 pounds or a setup with over 26,000 pounds combined weight, then you need a class B license.

South Carolina: If you’re driving a single vehicle over 26,000 pounds then you need a class E license. Multiple vehicles over 26,000 pounds in combined weight require a class F license.

Texas: When driving a single vehicle over 26,000 pounds, you need a class B license. If it’s multiple vehicles with a combined weight of 26,000 pounds, then you need a class A vehicle.

Wyoming: For those of you towing vehicles over 26,000 pounds and towing under 10,000 pounds, you need a class B license. For those of you with vehicles over 26,000 pounds and towing over 10,000 pounds, you need a class B.

States Not Requiring Special Driver’s Licenses for RV Drivers

What Should You Do When You’re Ready to Start Driving Your RV?

If you’re ready to start driving your RV, but you aren’t sure what you need to do, the best thing to do is to speak to your local DMV.

When you do this, you’ll know for sure what you need, but the above information should get you in a good spot to understand what’s required of you.

After you’re sure that you’re legal to be on the road, it’s time to start learning how to drive your RV. If you pay close attention and practice carefully, you’ll be ready for a cross-country road trip before you know it.

There are a lot of people that get started and are worried that they might not do a good job, but before they know it, they’re confidently driving their RV.

If you want to avoid most of these challenges when you’re ready to go RV, just get a smaller rig and you’ll be good to go.

You might find some of my other articles helpful as you’re figuring out RV life. Take a look at How to Dewinterize a Camper and How to Do an RV Power Awning Upgrade.

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Hi, I'm Jessica. Myself, my husband, 4 boys, our cat, Draco, and our dog, Patton spent 2.5 years RVing America full-time. It's an experience I'll never forget and I hope you get the opportunity to do something similar if that's what you want too. Make sure to bookmark the website and share it with a friend that wants to do the same.

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